THE END OF THE REBELLION

He lay still, daring not to breath for as long as he could, pain spilling from his cleaved wound.

A ghostly still settled over the moor, the misty rain continued to fall. The quiet was broken by the moans of the injured. Each time a rebel was found, a gunshot echoed over the field. ‘No quarter given’ had been the order cried by the victors.

He had been there to witness the homecoming, hope and enthusiasm sweeping the nation. They had been so close only to be betrayed by their English cousins. And now it was over. He had seen the Bonnie Prince flee the field.

He froze as the ground behind him moved. A bayonet point prodded at his shoulder. He tried not to wince.

‘One for good measure, rebel scum,’ snarled a voice.

He braced himself. The air moved as the bayonet swung down, burying itself in his side. He couldn’t cry out. He heard laughter as the soldier called out to a comrade and moved on.

A black crow flew down and landed on his face. Still he did not move. All he could think of was Mairi and the home he hadn’t seen for six months.


20-ceayr-january-21st-2018
Copyright CE Ayr

Written as part of Sunday Photo Fiction. Write a story of around 200 words based on the photo prompt given (above). Hosted by Al Forbes. For more details visit HERE.

To read more stories based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

I couldn’t help but link this prompt to a story I wrote only a few days ago for another prompt: CULLODEN.

32 responses to “THE END OF THE REBELLION”

  1. Another good piece of writing Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I so enjoy your writing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Jennie, much appreciated

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome, Lain

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Terrific stuff, Iain.
    I visited Culloden again last spring, and the echoes are still there.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks CE, they certainly are.

      Like

  4. The pain we inflict upon one another in the name of God, country, or some other lame excuse is unbelievable.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. And we never seem to learn…

      Liked by 2 people

  5. This character has a powerful determination to survive.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Michael, that he does.

      Like

  6. A wonderful piece of historically influenced fiction, Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Sometimes you have to display extraordinary courage for who and what you love.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. They didn’t lack for that. Thanks James

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Your ability to take us into the story with so few words amazes me.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Even though I’m a quarter english/Scottish I did not know about this battle at Collodum until watching the show “Highlighander” on Netflix. I quite like it, as I liked your story. But I was reading it and thinking about it in the context of the show. I’ve only seen up until the first episode of season 3 so I don’t know what happens. But I think of. The main character Jaimee and his friends and hope they are not the men being finished off with a blow to their death wounds. Well written Ian. And looking forward to seeing the rest of season 3 and learning more about Scottish History.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Mandi. Glad you like it. I have only seen a little of the show. It seems to have a big fan base, but I couldn’t get into it – perhaps because being Scottish I know the history a bit. Certainly makes for a dramatic story.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yeah some episodes are really good and some are a bit boring as they are building to something. It improves a great deal towards the end of the first season. It’s based on a book I believe. Yes if you know the history well, you might not be as interested. The magic woven into the show despite the stark reality of death, disease, war wounds, infection, characters with certain sexual habits, etc and the love story between the main characters and supporting characters makes for an interesting show when you’re in the right mood. Have a good Tuesday 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  10. An excellent follow up to an excellent story. Brilliant writing.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Intense story. My only stumbling point was ‘cleaved.’ Is there a better word?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. Collins English Dictionary defines ‘cleave’ as – ‘To cleave something means to split or divide it into two separate parts, often violently,’ which was the meaning I was hoping to convey.

      Like

  12. Those battles bring out the best in some and the worst in others. I hope he somehow survives. Good writing, Iain. —- Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I know very little of Scottish history, but the brutality of war is universal. You created quite a powerful scene with this story.

    I apologize for taking so long to respond. Life had other plans.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Susan – no apology needed.

      Like

  14. This was so vividly painted – awesome writing.

    Liked by 1 person

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