THE BEGINNING OF A REVOLUTION

Mist rolled down the hillside into the base of the valley where the small hamlet lay.

Silence ruled as the hanging shroud dampened any sound.

Then, cutting through the atmosphere, a clear, sharp repeated noise emerged.

‘Slap, slap, slap’ footsteps against the rock path descending the slope. It was joined by another, louder noise. A voice shouting through the gloom.

‘The wait is over. I have seen the man to save our country!’

Beth Cameron, watching the livestock near the barn was the first to see the silhouette emerge.

She was surprised to recognise young Robert MacPherson. He had left for the big smoke of the city after the last harvest.

Others stuck their heads out from windows and doors.

Robert stopped in the middle of the hamlet next to the well and, finally catching his breath, bellowed out his message:

‘The Bonnie Prince has taken Edinburgh!’

The men of the hamlet approached him. There were cheers and congratulations.

‘He intends to raise an army and march on England. Who will join with me?’

The mist rolled away, revealing the scent of fresh revolution in the wild landscape.


waiting
Copyright Sue Vincent

This is a response to the Thursday Photo Prompt – Watcher  curated over at Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo. Click on the link to read other stories inspired by the image.

Bonnie Prince Charlie and the 1745 Jacobite Uprising in Scotland: Wikipedia

24 responses to “THE BEGINNING OF A REVOLUTION”

  1. Nice story. In 1700 through mid 1900 England was ruling half the world. How successful was the revolution? Anyway, revolution is so romantic, till authorities come down heavily with Jack boots. Nice story. I love historical stories.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A glorious failure this one, the Scottish army made it halfway down to England, before indecision and internal arguing among other things led to retreat and ultimately being crushed by government forces. It was the last land battle fought in Britain.

      Like

  2. Beautifully written. I love European History and historical literature. I enjoyed your story immensely, Iain 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

  3. Great story, Iain. It reads like historical literature. Well done!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

  4. History begins with the smallest of things sometimes…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. 300 years on, it’s still taught in schools.

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      1. Not enough history is taught these days, in my opinion.

        Liked by 2 people

  5. This is a beautiful description of the beginning of the end with the massacre on Culloden moor.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Wonderful take on the prompt, Iain. I thought you might go in this direction. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you – hope that doesn’t mean I’m getting too predictable! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Not at all. It was where my head went as well, and I remember your flash fiction (I reblogged it) about Culloden from the crow’s perspective. It was wonderful.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. So nice that you remember an old story of mine 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  7. Not William Wallace then 💜💜…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. No, the other one lol 🙂

      Like

      1. I yes but Brave heart caused such a stir I couldn’t rest get the wooden spoon out 🌹

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Sorry meant to say great post 💜

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Sorry I meant to say great post 💜

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Excellent, Iain. I like the historical slant.

    Liked by 2 people

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