PICK-UP

PICK-UP

They waved him through the road block. No one noticed the sweat on his hands where they gripped the steering wheel. No one checked the rusty trunk on the rusty flatbed truck. They were looking for a Prius, not a clapped out pick-up.

He drove for another five miles, then pulled into a layby. He unlocked the trunk. The kid was still asleep. Perhaps he had used too much of the drug. He wasn’t a pharmacist.

He dialled the number on the burner phone. She answered, distraught.

‘Two million, or you never see the kid again.’ He hung up and tossed the phone.


Copyright Bill Reynolds

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more details HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visiHERE.

72 responses to “PICK-UP”

  1. Dear Iain,

    That story certainly took a sinister turn. I wasn’t familiar with the word layby. Another to add to my list of British terms. Love it. Some of them even find their way into my vocabulary which gets me interesting looks. And Bob’s your uncle.
    Good story, sir.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I was thinking along the lines Neil did thought I figured he had already made the drop off location known… Of course, I read your response and see the plan 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Reminds me of the story I read, “The Chain,” where a child gets kidnapped and in order to get the child back the parents have to pay a ransom AND kidnap another child. Scary stuff. Great take on the photo though!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Oh boy, he’s a cool customer. Very tense story. Leaves me in an agony of suspense about the welfare of the little boy and his family. And road block personnel should always check for sweaty palmed drivers with kid-sized trunks in back. Dead give-away.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. You’ve got to pick your friends carefully around here. Having someone reading your stories trying to decide whether they’re going to save your life or carve you up. Steal your share of the loot, or kidnap your kid. It’s a tough world. I really enjoyed your story and think you did well in 100 words and hiding someone in that rust bucket.
    I hope the kid gets home safely and this character rots away in gaol. However, this guy is crafty and could get away with it.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Powered pack in 100 words … those pesky ransoms. Who has 2 million dollars.
    Keep the kid. LOL just kidding. Oh my G-d, I can just see people outraged with me saying that.
    I do have a sick sense of humor. BUT … you know kidnapped kids or adults never seem to come out alive.
    Let’s hope he really wants the money and gets it so the child can be returned.
    Have a wonderful weekdend, Iain.
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Ooooo creepy. Sounds reasonably planned, second vehicle, drugs… hopefully she gets her kid back. I wonder what his motive is…I mean a part from money. Sounds desperate. Great tension and descriptions of his mood

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Who cares about the drop-off. That can be arranged. I found it much better that you focussed on the state of the kid, that makes the horror of the kidnapping complete. Great, tense story.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’m having almost as much with the comments as with the story, here Iain – and that’s how you know it is a really great story, when people have so much fun with it. Great story told in so few words too.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Plot twist: this occurred during the pandemic. Mom sent the 2mil with the instruction to keep her kid.

    Great story. It was sinister, but not *too* sinister – just the right amount of sinister. Now, if he hadn’t gotten the drug dose correct… Well then, that would be a whole lotta sinister.

    Liked by 1 person

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