BAD FAITH

The world lurched from side-to-side. She staggered into the busy marketplace, bumping into people milling around the stalls. Disgruntled looks followed her as she crossed the square. The church loomed above her. It looked sinister now, after what she had just been told. It had been her haven. A safe place that protected her from all the bad in the world. Now it sneered at her, malevolent and evil. How could they have lied to her? How could they have covered it up? How could they have protected him? And her sweet boy. She remembered his pale, limp body. And now she knew, at last, why he had chosen to leave her.

Copyright Roger Bultot

Written for Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more detailsΒ HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visitΒ HERE

62 responses to “BAD FAITH”

  1. Well expressed. There is a back-story and definitely scope for Part-2.
    Reader wants to know more.
    Poor her. She has had to suffer…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Dear Iain,

    Full of grief and anger. Well written…and left me wanting to know more. (Drat that word limit πŸ˜‰ )

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I stretched the word limit as far as I could πŸ˜‰

      Like

  3. I like the way you leave the reader to fill in most of the story

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Like the others, I want to know more, but I do have some guesses. Stories that come out that are a little too common.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Far too common. Thanks Trent

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, and hopefully we won’t see it on a very large scale soon!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Sorry, I was looking at the wrong thing when I respond – yes, far too common, unfortunately. (Though I guess my response almost made sense….)

        Liked by 1 person

  5. A poignant story told in so few words.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. My first thought was death by COVID, but it could be any number of ills that wrought this.
    Proof of your skill that you’ve kept us all riveted, and we still don’t know!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Liz, I didn’t have Covid in mind with this one, but I like that it can be interpreted a number of ways πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Me too! πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Excellent story! Too many parents have suffered in the same way.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, alas you are right.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. So many unanswered questions, the pain she feels is palpable.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Masterly story-telling, Iain. You tell us so much by implication.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Dramatic snapshot in a bigger story. I have a feeling if she survives this she is going to want revenge.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She certainly will want to hold someone accountable, which seems to be lacking in the real world today.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I know what you mean 😦

        Liked by 1 person

  11. self-preservation is always the main goal of the church. anything that threatens it is swept under the rug.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Yes, I guess I know where you went with this one. And it’s a tragedy that the reader can so easily reach that conclusion these days. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, you don’t even have to say it… Thanks Sandra

      Like

  13. Heart breaking, whatever the cause.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. many things left unsaid. interesting

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Excellent, Iain.
    I am glad for the word limit as you managed it so well. I can complete the larger parts of the story in my mind; the cause, effect; and conclusion.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Bill, very kind.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Palpable grief that will last, I fear, for a lifetime. Wonderful snippet from a story I’d like to read, Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Oh

    There is a lot here. I love the description of staggering through town seeing the church on a slant after having learned the crooked truth. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Laurie, very kind πŸ™‚

      Like

  18. A tragic story, sadly experienced by too many families. I like how you’ve used the photo to show her world being knocked out of balance by what she’s discovered.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Margaret, much appreciated

      Liked by 1 person

  19. You create a real ‘shadow story’, hinted at and dark. Well written Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much πŸ™‚

      Like

  20. Thrilling! Left me really wanting to find out more.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Patricia, glad you liked it.

      Like

  21. Well penned. A reality of betrayal for all too many. Some for whom it’s been too late.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Organized religion has a long history of cover-ups and rewriting history. There are many options to fill in the gaps here. Well described.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, it doesn’t have a great track record.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Another reader here definitely wanting to know more. I was immediately drawn into feeling her pain and disorientation, well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for visiting and commenting Heather! πŸ™‚

      Like

  24. You read the picture well.. It was great picture to write about and you did it well,

    Liked by 1 person

  25. That all sounds pretty sinister and tragic. I leaped to my own backstory πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s the idea. I think most people have leaped to the intended back story. Thanks!

      Like

  26. Powerful story. As a child abuse survivor who chooses to stay Catholic “despite all that,” this is very hard to respond to. I deeply respect people who choose to make a cause of this, deeply mourn those we have lost, stand with those who fight, and a hundred feelings. I keep wanting to scream at all the people who say “they had no idea.” I know someone who “knows a lot of priests” who I believe says – everyone knew who those guys were. We say “we had no idea” but people did, and do. I find that far more credible. I know my parents legit did not believe me (at first) but people like that cannot “resist the urge” and they are caught when more kids came forth.
    It’s such a pattern. Such a cycle. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for sharing your comment Anne, it’s a difficult subject to write about, but one that needs to be acknowledged, and thankfully has, and continues to be exposed. I hope I managed to do it in a way that didn’t offend.

      Like

  27. It’s sad. Very well written Iain

    Liked by 1 person

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