MOLLY

She stood at the window looking out at the harbour.

They told her to give up. They told her there was no hope. Years had gone by.

They’d lost her Molly once before when she wandered off into the woods and didn’t return. She was found the next day in her bivouac of branches and leaves. Molly laughed at her parents’ worrying, ‘I’ll always come home,’ she smiled.

If only she had stopped her. But she could never say no to Molly, never bring herself to restrain that natural joy of life, that spirit of adventure.

Now she had lost her husband, her looks, her job. She refused to lose her Molly.

The traditional lighthouse at the end of the sea wall had gone, replaced by a metal abomination. Around their small house modern hotels crowded in. The cargo ships grew larger every year.

Still she waited and each time a sail appeared her heart would beat a little faster. Each time another little part of her crumbled.

They had never found any wreckage of Molly’s boat.

A small sailboat rounded the wall, tacking against the breeze. Her Molly would come home one day. She had promised she always would.


2018-11-november-26th-2017
Copyright A Mixed Bag

Written as part of Sunday Photo Fiction. Write a story of around 200 words based on the photo prompt given (above). Hosted by Al Forbes. For more details visit HERE.

To read more stories based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

36 responses to “MOLLY”

  1. A very moving piece Iain, beautifully told.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I felt myself waiting with her.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, a great compliment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re most welcome. I loved your story.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Hope keeps people going ….

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Even when to others it seems all is lost.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Just the thought of the waiting mother makes me sad. I wonder where Molly is.
    Beautifully written.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. A truly heartwarming tale. A mother never gives up on her child.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. So sad. I could imagine being that mother.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Maggie. I do hope no one ever has to go through something like that, but of course there are those that do.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I hope she does but so many small boats go down without a trace, another of the sea’s mysteries.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Very, very good, Iain, superb construction, powerful pathos

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you CE, appreciated.

      Like

  9. I can almost feel her heartbreak. Well-done, Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I am looking forward to the stories which develop out of this prompt. Great start Iain

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Very beautifully have you etched the pain of the waiting and wailing mother.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I knew our great minds would think alike one day! Nice one Iain
    Click to visit Keith’s Ramblings

    Liked by 1 person

  13. This story really tugs at the heart, Iain. Such good writing —- Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Suzanne

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Wow. That was a really moving story Iain. The constant hope through the every changing environment.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Such a sad one. I get this image of this woman waiting, suspended in time almost, waiting for Molly to come home despite the ship wreck. I can even picture her as a ghost 100 years later, still waiting. Great writing Ian your stories just get better and better every time I pop over for a read. Hope you are well and that you are your family enjoy the holidays. Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Mandi, such a nice thing to say! I hope they are getting better. Hope you are well and are looking forward to the holidays too. I must find the time to catch up on your blog too 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks Ian. It’s true you know 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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