HOLD ON TO THE LIGHT

He should’ve gotten on the train.

He could’ve been in the countryside with his sister.

But he didn’t want to leave Mother in the city. Not with the air raids and bombs falling.

Then he had gotten lost trying to get home from the station. The old lady found him and took him to her house, gave him soup and a bed.

In the morning she promised to take him back to his home.

The old lady was probably dead now, buried under the rubble of her house, just like him.

Through the small gap between the masonry that held him captive he could see the sun rising. He tried to call out. The crushing weight on his chest strangled his cries.

With his free hand he put his fingers round the emerging orb, like he was holding it.

Hold on to the light, he thought. His eyes closed. As he drifted away he heard a faint shout.

‘Over here. Bring a stretcher.’

I’m coming, Mum. I just have to hold on to the light.


photo-20180129154606147
Copyright Goroyboy

Written as part of Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers. The challenge is to write a flash fiction story in around 150 – 175 words, based on the weekly photo prompt. Thanks as always to the challenge host Priceless Joy. For more information visit HERE.

To read other stories based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

51 responses to “HOLD ON TO THE LIGHT”

  1. michael1148humphris Avatar
    michael1148humphris

    Within a great story, the magic that is sun light is so well defined,

    Liked by 2 people

  2. The tragedies of war — some lives saved, many more lost.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Love how he is holding onto the light! You incorporated hope into a tragedy. Good job!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

  4. A fabulous story of positivity using light as a metaphor for hope and deliverance.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. An unfulfilled goal can turn into a life purpose, and spur life. Well delineated mindset!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Tugged at the heart strings till the end. Iain, for some reason, whether intentional or not,that simple bowl of soup spoke volumes of a time where food was not abundant but what they had was shared. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, glad you picked up on that detail too. Thanks for the prompt 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Lovely narrative and a hopeful end. Great take on this one.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Amazing story. Filled with emotions, and tension.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, very kind 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Wonderful story! Really powerfully written.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. That is a touching and magical response to the image. I love both the image and the story!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Pamela 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Took me a minute to realize that Mum was dead and that he was hanging between life and death.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It can be read a few different ways James. I have left it open as to the fate of his Mum, she could be sitting at home completely unharmed and unaware of what has happened to her boy, which was how I envisioned it. But I’m happy for readers to take from it what they will.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Creative take and great cliffhanger!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Very touching! I love how you create the scene and time of your story! Great story, Iain!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I think this is my favorite of your stories so far. It’s got everything in it. Any chance this is related to the German Blitz attack on Coventry? Either way, I love the way he held on to life by grasping the light. That’s just beautiful. Standing ovation for you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was thinking of the Blitz, although in my head I pictured London, but Coventry went through much the same. Thanks for the high praise – I fear the only way is down with my next effort! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I can see this story happening with the blitz in London. His sister safe in the country but he chose to stay with his Mum only to get lost. Glad he held onto the light. That was a powerful beautiful story that took us through a range of emotions.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Irene, that was the picture I was striving to paint.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Beyond beautiful. Really really liked your story and felt his positivity despite the ache in your delicate last line .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Moon, a very satisfying comment to receive.

      Like

  17. This is so good, Michael!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks (I think, it’s Iain, not Michael! 🙂 )

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yikes! How did I goof on that? Apologies!!! And thank you. Your name, all in lower case letters, reads Lain. So, are you Lain or Iain? Better late than never. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Iain – I think only in America does it cause confusion with Lain – I get a few people calling me that – I have given up correcting them! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I think it’s because of how it looks on your blog photo. Different than an I that is typewritten. Well, this American is happy to be corrected. Thank you, Iain. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Nice story. It reminds me of something I read years ago by Albert Payson Terhune. I believe it was part of Gray Dawn.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I will look out for it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s great, thanks – I will give it a look 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  19. Lovely story Iain. I am glad the boy was rescued. Great take on the prompt

    Liked by 1 person

  20. So powerful.
    Ellespeth

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much Ellespeth 🙂

      Like

  21. Another interesting wartime tale. I wonder if the stretcher reaches him in time or if he goes to see his mom in Heaven, into the light.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It can be read either way, I guess it depends if you’re an optimist or a pessimist. Thanks Mandi.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think you always have to hope. But weather he lives or dies, either path can be a good one. The chance at life after the war or peace or no pain in the afterlife.

        Liked by 1 person

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