THE WORST NUCLEAR BUNKER IN THE WORLD

October 28th 1962, the town of Midwest, Wyoming, USA.

‘But why clothes pegs?’

‘Very useful things, you never know when you might need one.’

Jack looked again at the selection of jars and packets on the shelves.

‘It doesn’t seem like much. Wouldn’t we need to stay underground for months or years?’

Victor sighed. ‘It’s a start.’

Jack picked up a bottle of brandy that was only half-full and looked at Victor.

‘Aunt Doris been round, has she?’

‘We can replenish,’ Victor paused and glanced at the top shelf with a guilty look. ‘We might need to top on the red wine too.’

‘Let’s just hope they can hold off the missiles until you get back from the store then.’

***

Later that night the news announced that Krushchev had agreed to withdraw Soviet missiles from Cuba.

Sitting among crates of supplies piled up in the living room, Jack consoled a crestfallen Victor. ‘At least we’ve got plenty of brandy and wine to celebrate with.’


photo-20161009092947512

Written as part of Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers. The challenge is to write a flash fiction story, in around 150 words based on the weekly photo prompt. For more information visit HERE.

For more stories based on the prompt this week, visit HERE.

50 responses to “THE WORST NUCLEAR BUNKER IN THE WORLD”

  1. The Liver doesn’t like this… 😀 Lovely story!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Best to be prepared, though eh? Jack would have been grateful for those clothes pegs if the world had gone bang. Nicely written with a wry sliver running through. Great stuff Iain

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Lynn, one of those ones where I’m not sure how I ended up with this story, but it seems to work okay! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The mind wanders to some strange places … Great story 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. A timely reminder I feel in these troubled times. Nice story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Might be a good time to have an old bunker in the back garden that can be dusted off and restocked! Thanks Graham.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I lived in Switzerland where bunkers were compulsory in every house built but even the Swiss have relaxed the obligation these days.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Interesting, especially as they were a neutral country.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Still have compulsory military service though and mountains hollowed out like gruyere cheese with military installations 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  4. During the Cuban Missile Crisis, I was a little boy in the hospital having my tonsils removed. My Dad was in the Air Force, and many years later, I learned he was in a missile bunker with a fellow serviceman waiting for orders from the President to fire their nukes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow, must have been some experience to live through. Thankfully the order never came. Would be the basis of a great story as well.

      Like

      1. I was only made aware of it by my parents when I was an adult. As a child, I was totally oblivious to the crisis. All I knew was that I had my tonsils out and my throat hurt. Ignorance is bliss.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Sometimes it’s definitely better not to know some of the things going on, or we’d all be stocking our bunkers I’m sure!

          Like

  5. Well written. I hope things do not come to this in part of the world.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, I hope so too.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Hahaha! They knew what they needed the most in that nuclear bunker! Good thing they got to enjoy the liquor as a celebration and not because of nuclear fallout. Great story Iian!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks PJ – indeed they did – the alternative title could have been The BEST Nuclear Bunker, depending on how you look at it! 🙂

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      1. Hahaha! That’s true! I think they planned on staying drunk through the fallout!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Red wine for oblivion – good thinking Jack and Victor! (THAT Jack and Victor?)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A small tribute to that Jack and Victor that a few Scots will pick up on, as they’re back on the telly now! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Very cleverly done 🙂 I think alcohol would be the most important thing to stock up on to be fair!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. In that situation I think it might be the only thing to help! Many thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Much better to celebrate than the alternative! Fun story, Iain!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Indeed, I’m sure they’ll get over their disappointment 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I’m sure they are thankful they get to enjoy all that wine in peaceful times and not in the bunker! This day and time, I often think we should start stocking up our safe haven….our world is changing rapidly and it is not for the good! Great story and a reminder (not that most of us need it) of the serious decision to be made soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Many thanks. It’s strange that we fail to learn from history and keep making the same mistakes – which made this feel like a relevant story to write.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. lol! loved this story, Iain.
    Cheers!
    Ellespeth

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ellespeth 🙂

      Like

  12. Many years later, I discovered my father had a brochure on how to build a bomb shelter. We never did, but dad wasn’t the DYI, fixer-upper type.
    Great story. With lots of humour and timely thoughts.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do wonder how much use a DIY bomb shelter would be in the worst case scenario. Might be fun to build though 🙂

      Like

      1. Good family bonding weekend project, lol.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. This is sweet and brilliant at once.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Brilliant. Loved the punch line

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, made me laugh too 🙂

      Like

  15. I liked the story for the neat way it highlighted common human nature. We tend to focus on the immediate and personal losses/gains without considering the larger picture. They are more worried about the piled up food rather than being relieved that there wasnt any need of it! Good writing 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for reading and commenting 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. a very wise take, Iain! proved better be ready! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Let’s hope it doesn’t come to this! Thanks 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I well remember all these worries in the ’60s, and the relief when it all eased off. I like the way your story takes a look at those times in a fun way, and blaming poor old Aunt Doris for the lowered brandy level was a gem. Let’s hope such shelters are never needed again – although I’m sure there are still plenty around today, just in case. Well written, Iain. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Millie. Some might be restocking their bunkers just now, hopefully not needed as you say 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  18. At least they’ll be able to enjoy their provisions in a more celebratory situation. Great story, Iain. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, i’m sure they will cheer up once they open a bottle of wine or two 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Well, they have their stash to give them some comfort 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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