ED’S DINER

Two eggs sunnyside up, greasy fries and plenty of ketchup. I’d cut out the red meat, doctor’s orders.

Thirty years I’ve been coming to Ed’s Diner for lunch.

The decor has stayed the same. Green leather seats, dirty orange ceiling, chipped fake marble counter.

Ed has aged along with the building, looking out through the hatch while he grills and fries the food.

Meryl was fresh-faced when I first ordered from her. Now she was looking forward to retirement.

Ed’s closes next week for refurbishment. New owners coming in. Ed and Meryl won’t be back when it reopens. Neither will I.


inside-the-diner

Written as part of the Friday Fictioneers challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more details HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

82 responses to “ED’S DINER”

  1. Oh, nicely done Iain. Such a great atmosphere, I can almost feelt the greasy counter top! Great tale

    Liked by 1 person

      1. My total pleasure 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Well done. Not everyone is all about: out with the old, in with the new. The familiar sometimes makes everything better. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Sascha, I think I like the familiar things in life too 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Very nice piece. So much said in so few words.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sounds like a full changing of the guard Iain. It happens often.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There’s no stopping time.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. A lots aid here, about the place , the owners and the customers xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Shehanne.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Love the atmosphere… somehow I feel that the next generation will have another menu….

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think so, it will probably be called a bistro or something more chic.

      Like

  7. I’ve known a few places like that over the years. One of a kind diners which sadly have almost all been replaced by soulless franchises.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very much for thought I had writing this. Thanks James. I need to find time and see how your alphabet story is coming along.

      Like

  8. excellente! Loved it!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. The inevitable march of time and the impact that it has. Good stuff.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. michael1148humphris Avatar
    michael1148humphris

    I see this story as a lovely tribute to quite a few places where I once dined. Sadly the only real alternative, is for the proprietors to die on the job.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very true Michael. Perhaps Ed deserves a bit of a quiet retirement.

      Like

  11. Great story! I got a powerful sense of the history of this old diner.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Chock one up for loyalty!!!! What a delightful take. You described an old diner, with great owners, so well. Kudos.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Alicia, much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My pleasure. Always enjoy your 100-words.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. The passing of an era, an institution. There was a pool hall here, Roger’s Rec, once Roger sold out it was never the same. You captured the spirit of the customer well, Iain. Good job.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. I could feel the air of melancholy, sense the reluctance to say goodbye to memories. A tale lovingly told, Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I have to agree with everyone, Iain. Great atmosphere. I could almost smell the grease from the fried stuff! They just don’t make ’em like that anymore. And when they try to… they just try too hard! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Dale, the downside to globalisation, we’re all eating the same things in the same places.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Lovely story, great atmosphere!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Such great atmosherics. You have captured the onsluaght of globalsiation and the meek surrender of innocence to it. Great writing, Lian. Reading you has now become a ritual. Excellent writing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ah, very kind Neel, glad you are enjoying my efforts.

      Like

  18. Some change is just no good. Lovely story.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Sad, the end of an era.
    Yeah, I’m sure cutting out the red meat will make all the difference. Don’t worry about the greasy chips and fried eggs 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The doctor may have requested those too, but there’s only so much a man can be expected to give up!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Those old places were like our well worn jackets … shabby and comfortable.
    Lovely description.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. It wouldn’t be the same under new management, would it? Your story has a passing of generations as mine does while still being different. Great descriptions, Iain. I could see the place. Good writing. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  22. But of sad nostalgia there Iain. Time moves on.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Laurie, it does indeed.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. The end of an era, aye? I totally get it. Ed’s will never be the same without Ed, will it? Nice description. I could smell the grease. Ha!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I agree with Sasha. There are certain places that are special because they are familiar and they have a feel about them. Enjoyed this.☺

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You are welcome indeed.

        Liked by 1 person

  25. Dear Iain,

    Years ago I worked in a little hamburger place. It had been on the same corner for years, run and owned by Ed and Frances. The place was famous for cheap tacos and the best homemade onion rings in the world. (I made and ate plenty of them.) When Ed and Frances decided to retire and sell the place, a young man took it over and updated it. Within months he went out of business.
    Your well written story brought back these memories. I could smell the greasy french fries.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Rochelle, glad it brought back happy memories, especially the coincidental choice of name! 🙂

      Like

  26. “New improved” is not necessarily how things are. I often dread seeing those two words on something that had nothing wrong with it in the first place. Refurbishments to establishments that have been there for decades have to be carried out with great sensitivity, if they’re not going to drive long-standing customers away. I guess that the owners of the business hope to attract a new clientele, but quite often a business goes bust because people go elsewhere whilst the place is closed, and don’t necessarily return. I’ve certainly seen this happen with shops. In fact, I’ve done an Ed and Meryl on one of my local shops recently.

    Like

  27. I can hear the dishes clanking.. Order UP! Well written I enjoyed it Iian.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. When I travelled for work I would always use a transport cafe when I could. Man-sized bacon sandwiches and big mugs of tea – lovely!

    Liked by 1 person

  29. The people that bought my bistro from me tried to change it. They lost an awful lot of money. People still stop me in the street and say how much they miss it. Oh well…!
    Click to read my Friday Fiction

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s nice to be missed. I hope they found somewhere else to eat!

      Like

  30. A lifetime in 100 words! Very nice Iain 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  31. It’s not always all about the food. Sometimes it’s about who makes and serves the food. I loved your story, Iain. :o)

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Diners really do bring out feelings of comfort and needed predictability in a too transient world. I hate when an iconic establishment disappears. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. I get a great sense of sadness from this – the ending of an era and none of the characers will be better for it, I fear. Loved the descriptions – ‘dirty orange ceiling, chipped fake marble counter’ – they say so much.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Sarah Ann, glad you liked it.

      Like

  34. Life Lessons of a Dog Lover Avatar
    Life Lessons of a Dog Lover

    Nicely written, you made the greasy diner come alive. Love the last line.

    Like

  35. The story of the diner and the people who love it–I can almost taste the food! Great one.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Emily 🙂

      Like

  36. You’ve done an excellent job describing the setting.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Dirty orange ceilings and greasy fries can be a comfort. Some things should not change.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. You really caught the atmosphere of the diner. It reminds me of so many English pubs that have been refurbished into modern soulless places.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Definitely a curse of modernisation.

      Liked by 1 person

  39. Well told Iain. The regret and sense of loyalty come across brilliantly

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Michael.

      Like

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