DIANA

Lise blinked as the light glinted in the small window. The sheet beneath her was cool against her skin.

She lay on her side and watched the sun play on her pale flesh. Lifting her hand she placed it on her stomach. Auguste would notice the broadening abdomen soon.

Today he promised to finish. He had gone ahead to begin without her. She could tell he was pleased with the painting although they would never accept it at the Salon.

Putting on her peignoir she wandered outside. The bright sun warmed her as she followed the path through the trees. Her spirits lifted as she felt the new life growing inside her.


diana
Diana, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1868
janet-webb-french-still-life
Copyright Janet Webb

Written as part of the Friday Fictioneers challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more details HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

Lise Trehot modelled for most of Pierre-Auguste Renoir‘s early works and was rumoured to have been his mistress. She is believed to have given birth to a boy, Pierre, in 1868, but it is unclear what became of him. In 1870 she gave birth to a girl, Jeanne, who Renoir supported financially for the rest of his life. After she stopped posing for Renoir, Lise never spoke to him again, and Renoir never mentions her in any memoirs or interviews.

 

103 responses to “DIANA”

  1. I like the fact that they don’t communicate with each other in this piece. That’s clever, Iain

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Neil, appreciated.

      Like

  2. Very atmospheric, and so appropriate for the photo.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Somehow, in one hundred words, I got a sense of their relationship before I read the footnote. Well done.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Sandra, I’m glad that came across.

      Like

  4. Great job! Thanks for the footnote at the end, very interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Joy, glad you liked it.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Dear Iain,

    There’s a wistful poignancy to this piece. I’ll never look at a Renoir in quite the same way again. Nicely done.

    Shalom,
    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Rochelle, very kind.

      Like

  6. Appreciate the inspiration and your rich story.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Awesome take. Thanks for the peep in to Renoir’s life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very kind, thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Renoir in a new light. This one was silent but made a loud impact. Nicely written, Ian.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Seriously, Iain, I’m impressed. I really loved reading this. I’m always a sucker for the great artists. I wasn’t aware of Diana by Renoir, but it’s been a LONG time since school. I think I need to go to an art gallery soon, I have the time now.

    Five out of five bare bow-arms.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Many thanks – I think this one lives in London at the National Gallery – to be fair Renoir did an awful lot of paintings!

      Like

      1. Haha! True that! 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Such a beautiful, positive, artful take on the prompt. Very sensuous and appealing!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Great writing and I also appreciated the explanation. There have been some interesting explanations to the ones I’ve read so far and it’s great to have my brain cells stretched.
    xx Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Delightful Iain. A beautifully written piece of fiction with a nod to fact and history.

      Please click to read my FriFic

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Thank you much appreciated – the sign of a good prompt photo with lots of different interpretations.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. This was a great photo prompt. I’m looking forward to reading some more.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Brought to life so vividly. Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Some very educational entries this week. Good stuff.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Oh I did love this… I also noted the painting in the window… you are probably right that it’s Renoir.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, it certainly looks like his style, not that I’m much of an expert!

      Like

  15. Oh l love this. What a great story you told! Thanks for the background too. My art history is lacking.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Janet, glad I was able to entertain and inform 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Sascha 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. That is an interesting piece of history and you wrote a great story based on the same. Loved it.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I agree with Rochelle. This piece is incredibly wistful. There is also a sense of peace ~ and I’m not sure why. Perhaps because Lise seems resigned to what’s happening.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think that is the look Renoir has painted, she looks resigned yet accepting of her situation. Thanks Alicia

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Wow! A fantastic take, Iain. I’m very impressed. And thanks a ton for the background information as well. Cheers, Varad

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, much appreciated.

      Like

  19. Like the explanation you left. It’s quite a story. Good stuff 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Beautiful story. Love the historical note, too.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Life Lessons of a Dog Lover Avatar
    Life Lessons of a Dog Lover

    This was beautifully written. Loved the sun playing on her skin. Your addition about Renoir gave your story even more depth.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I’m glad you liked it.

      Like

  22. michael1148humphris Avatar
    michael1148humphris

    So much is said in this story. You blended the writers craft and art with finess.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. I just love this sort of thing. Thanks for making it real to me!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re very welcome!

      Liked by 1 person

  24. A sweetly positive story.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Nice, and thanks for the historical note. Something a bit different from you this week!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you – yes, nice to try and mix it up a bit 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Interesting. And good that he supported the child.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. The artist and his muse paint a great picture here. They seem to communicate through the art and of course the life growing inside her. a colourful piece of writing.

    http://ideasolsi65.blogspot.in/2017/07/the-candle-sits-tall-on-bronze-stand.html

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Lovely comment, thank you.

      Like

  28. I also wrote something artist related but with a bit of a darker tone.

    Like

  29. This is beautifully written, lovely historical fiction. I also loved the added information.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. You really set a mood with this one, lain. And what a sad ending for Renoir and his model.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. I think they both went on to have fairly happy lives, but a sad end for their friendship and relationship definitely.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. Caerlynn Nash Avatar
    Caerlynn Nash

    How cool to be inspired by a bit of history. Great story!

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Ahh the artist and his muse. No words spoken but evrrything explored. Beautiful piece Iain

    Liked by 1 person

  33. i consider this as one of your best. i felt like being there savoring the scenery as it enfolded before me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very kind, thank you so much.

      Liked by 1 person

  34. Terrific! I loved the mix of fact and fiction in this one. I never knew that he had an art model who figured so prominently in his paintings so thanks for that link too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re welcome, thank you for the kind comment.

      Like

  35. I enjoyed this story very much. You make us aware of the characters subtly, and you hint at their relationship without spelling it out. Nice work.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Touching and really well written. Unfortunately I will now have Paul Anka’s “Diana” stuck in my head for the next few hours.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha, it’s a popular name 🙂

      Like

      1. True. Thankfully I’ve had the radio on and the Paul Anka earworm has gone. Still liked the story.

        Liked by 1 person

  37. This reminds me of Paul Harvey’s “Rest of the Story” episodes. Like someone else said, you made it real for me. Plus, I like full-figure girls. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha, ever considered impressionist portraits?

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Interesting bit of history Iain – nicely visualized. I read the story in the morning but didnt have time to comment 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Dahlia, glad you liked it 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  39. Beautiful article expression of real life using a still life!👌

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Such a lovely and uplifting story, beautifully told.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. This was a very revealing tale even though it was a short 100 words. Nicely completed … the footnote just added a bit of personal insight. It’s unfortunate they never spoke and he never mentioned her again. One has to wonder … don’t one?
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It certainly does make you wonder what actually happened between them. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  42. Great story and thanks for the footnote.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re welcome and thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  43. An interesting story based on history, Iain. Thanks for the addition of the painting. Good writing. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re welcome Suzanne, thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  44. I like the dreamy quality of this story. Before reading the footnote, I picked up on the fact that the painting was a nude portrait of the narrator, but thought that the gallery objected to exhibiting pregnant nudes on its wall. Then I saw your footnote, and understood. A very interesting bit of history that was new to me.

    Liked by 1 person

  45. That was gorgeous, Iain.
    The footnote bonus was most interesting as well..
    Beautifully done.

    Liked by 1 person

  46. Fabulous story. I’m a huge impressionist art fan and I love Renoir , Monet, etc. The theory of colorand light behind there art abs the visible paint strokes is wonderful. I do recall about this mistress, it’s quite possible the baby died or was never acknowledged so he was never written about. But at least he supported his daughter. I wonder why she never spoke to hi again (his mistress) if things simply ended for them, or if it was something he’d done. Great story Ian.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I guess we’ll never know. I like to think there’s a simple reason that they just both were happy to move on with their lives.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yeah I got that feeling 🙂 I can remember if I’m mixing Renoir/Degas up but about 10 yrs ago I saw this wonderful exhibition at the Musee des Beaux Arts in Quebec City, it had paintings but the impressionist sculpture this artist did was simply amazing too. As good the paintings in a different way though. Very find work but somehow that same artistic flare.
        Cheers Ian have a good week 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  47. Nice! I also like the background information you have given us here.

    Liked by 1 person

  48. Loved both the story and the footnote.
    Awesome piece.
    🙂
    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very kind, thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

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