FIELD HOSPITAL

Woozy. Sweat. Open eyes.

Peeling paint, damp patches, broken ceiling fan.

Movement next to me. Moist sheets. Another person.

She moans. Dark hair, dark skin.

Vague memories. A bar, drinking, her smiling face.

Sit up, look round. Dilapidated.

Head thumping. Air oppressive. Dry throat.

Stagger to the window. Old, wooden frame. Open it.

Humid air. Voices. Cries.

She turns, eyes looking at me. That smile.

The night is in the past.

To the dank bathroom. Cracked mirror reflects broken face.

Splash of water. Hands steady.

Ready for another day.

Ready for more victims.

Ready to do what little I can.


photoa

Written as part of the Friday Fictioneers challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more details HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

This April I am taking part in the A to Z Challenge once again. My theme is a collection of stories from around the countries of the European Union, and you can find them here: A TO Z CHALLENGE 2018

104 responses to “FIELD HOSPITAL”

  1. An evocative piece, Iain. You used the word limit well

    Liked by 2 people

  2. The photo reminded me of war as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yep, Apocalypse Now opening scene whenever I see a ceiling fan… I tried to leave it open that it could equally be the scene of a natural disaster too.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Great story. I like the rhythm.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, felt like the style would fit the prompt, a fractured building, a snatched image sort of thing.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Syria sprang to mind, but it could be almost anywhere these days. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yep, there’s a whole string of places it could apply to at this very moment.

      Like

  5. Eek! That’s a scary little story… It’s almost as if you stepped into one of the minds of a Nazi doctor with this one…at least that’s what I thought of as I read it…. shivers down my spine. Great write!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Interesting, it could be taken either way, he may be a good samaritan helping in a tragedy, or the other way/ Perhaps it says more about the reader’s mindset! Thanks Jelli 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Even I saw it as a sinister tale with an evil man at work – but wonderfully penned Iain 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You are all so cynical! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Dear Iain,

    You set the tone and the atmosphere with skill. I felt like I was there. Little said. Much told. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Rochelle, enjoyed writing this one.

      Like

  7. Wow – I can’t believe how much you have crammed into this story. All the told and untold aspects left me reeling. Well done!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

    1. Thank you Susan, very kind.

      Like

  8. There has been recent news coverage of a handful of charity workers taking advantage of the sexual availability of vulnerable people. I wonder whether that is your topic? It’s graphically written. You’ve constructed the story very cleverly so we only gradually realise what is important, and what he has to do, today and every day. The form is fragmentary, which imitates his state of mind; and then he grasps hold of the fact that his hands are steady, and the world comes into proper focus again; he knows who he is and what he has to do.
    This is fine writing Iain.

    Like

    1. Thank you Penny, I wondered if anyone would make the connection to those recent stories. I think we would have to know more about the identity of the woman in the bed to make any judgement – is she a fellow volunteer or doctor? both consenting adults? or a local woman in desperate times? a prostitute? is this just something they both need to get away from the horror of the tragedy they are in the middle of? Such a nice comment, thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I loved how you wrote this, Iain. The rhythm the style, the story itself. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Dale 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Very powerful. Touches the emotions! Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. These are the real heroes of battle. As the mother of two military kids, I am all for them.

    Like

    1. They certainly are heroes, I can’t imagine what they must see and deal with.

      Like

  12. I thought what Penny thought! The way this is written works so well for this story.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I liked your style of writing in this piece so much. Fragmented , choked, just like the tragedy they are trapped in. Brilliant!
    I think he is a good doctor who wants to save the victims of the nameless tragedy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I had in mind that he was a good guy too 🙂

      Like

  14. Great atmosphere in this piece Iain. I love the pace the short sentences give. Cleverly done. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Jennifer, much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I love how you took this from a possible romantic encounter to the field hospital. Skillfully done.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I enjoyed the way you put this together,.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Sounds like you were going down the Florence Nightingale path.. finding contentment even in the worst of circumstances.. the human at their finest:) I enjoy the punctual short sentences.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, pleased you liked it.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. this was written in a way i could visualize what was going on. well done as aways.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, much appreciated.

      Like

  19. Very visual story. That fan in the photo though, it is indeed dilapidated.

    http://findingeliza.com/

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Loved the rhythm and feel of it, very powerful stuff. As an aside, you are actually taking out time to write stories in addition to AtoZ also? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. Yes, although I’m skipping a few of my usual prompts for April, I can’t skip Friday Fictioneers. A few days ahead with my A to Z writing, so I had the time 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Great sense of “getting along however you can, grabbing a bit of company where you can find it”.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Well Written! Reminded me of so many amazing war movies! Like Full Metal Jacket, Apocalypse Now, The Deer Hunter etc. Those were some amazing watch!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Apocalypse Now was definitely in my mind when writing it 🙂

      Like

  23. Outstanding piece, Iain. There are so many possibilities here, as noted in the comments. Very impressive writing. Five stars.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Russell, much appreciated.

      Like

  24. A clever way to tell so much in so few words.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Stealing moments to himself in midst of chaos is how I read it. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, definitely the calm before the storm.

      Like

  26. I’m not sure if that turned nasty at the end or not?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I leave it entirely to your imagination to decide.

      Like

  27. A sad scene, but all too true.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Powerful. You had me right there with you.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Liked your story very much, honed prose, no words wasted, very atmospheric – well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Oooooo wow well told. The choppy sentences really drew me in.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. OH that’s so stark and atmospheric. Really strong and thought provoking

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Beautifully constructed. Excellent read.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Very powerful, thought-provoking and atmospheric.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I was right there. Brilliantly descriptive.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Great rhythm and story, but I’m not sure what to make of the enigmatic last lines. He might be helping her, or not…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I leave it to the eye of the beholder, what do you think? 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m an optimist and a romantic, so I really hope he’s helping her!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. That is what I thought as I was writing it 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  36. That is a very effective way to get the atmosphere across. Enjoy the moment, get ready for the onslaught. Wonderful writing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  37. I love the structural choices you have made – they fit so well with the subject matter 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  38. Doctors and nurses on or near the front line have a tough day – it would be hard to forget the sights and the cries and the smells. I’m glad he found solace for a short period during the night.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Irene, you sum it up perfectly.

      Liked by 1 person

  39. This was almost poetic with it’s rhythm.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. A surprise in the midst of reading your A to Z posts. I like Field Hospital. Compelling images, well written.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. there is a poetic flow to this piece. Nicely done

    Liked by 1 person

  42. Such a melodic piece, both melancholic and hopeful.

    Liked by 1 person

  43. A great piece of open poetry , I enjoyed reading this – although it has some dark undertones.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks James, it is a little unsettling!

      Liked by 1 person

  44. The style you chose to write this in gave it put us there in the protagonist’s mind. Well done

    Liked by 1 person

  45. So well done with those breathless sentences, the sense of exhaustion overwhelming.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Sarah Ann.

      Like

  46. Fractured building, fractured lives, fractured words – very fitting and well done Iain

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Lynn, much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  47. Very well done. You created an atmosphere, emotions, and motivation, and rendered them in a feeling of frustration along with duty.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Sascha, very kind.

      Like

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