WRATH UNBOWED

The dust swirled round the field. The earth had given them nothing in return for all their hard work again.

Aggie stood on the porch. No sign of Al returning, the urge took him every few weeks. She knew he would be home eventually.

They were all that was left, the last remaining links of a broken family chain.

Now there was just them and the baby that was coming. A new chain about to begin. Maybe this time it would be able to withstand what this country threw at it.

The dust continued to blow as she stepped back inside and closed the door.


linda-kreger-prompt
Copyright Linda Kreger

Written as part of the Friday Fictioneers challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more details HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

I recently finished reading John Steinbeck’s ‘The Grapes of Wrath’, so the idea of a family as a chain of support was in my mind when I saw the prompt. An extraordinary book, this is a snapshot of what may have become of Aggie and Al after the end of the novel.

To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.


From this Friday, 30th August, for one week only, my first novel, A JUSTIFIED STATE is available now for just 99p or 99¢ on Amazon Kindle. Just follow the links below:

AMAZON UK   AMAZON US

With only one month to go until my new novel STATE OF DENIAL is released, the first book in the trilogy is available at this special price for one week, so if you haven’t read it yet, now is the perfect time to get a copy.

Also available in Paperback from Amazon and Book Depository.

STATE OF DENIAL will be published on Kindle and in Paperback on 27th September.

70 responses to “WRATH UNBOWED”

  1. I loved the way you used the location to convey the mood

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Neil, very kind.

      Like

  2. The interesting concept – “the links” within the family. I found this week’s story poetic.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dear Iain,

    Like Grapes of Wrath, your story is disturbing and well written. I liked the family chain metaphor. Now, go listen to happy music pr watch a silly comedy. 😉

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha, thanks Rochelle – I do need something a little more light-hearted after reading ‘Grapes of Wrath’!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Well done! I hope the best for them!
    I am reading a book right now that has someone named “Aggie” in it so that threw me at first for I was like, what is she doing in his story? LOL!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha, maybe it is the same Aggie in a previous life! 🙂

      Like

  5. This was lovely, Iain. Clearly reading Mr Steinbeck is a great way to inspire good writing. (East of Eden is my favourite – but Grapes of Wrath is a game changer too.)

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Susan. For me ‘Of Mice and Men’ is up there with my all time favourites 🙂

      Like

  6. Reminded me of some of the anecdotes in Ken Burns’s Dust Bowl documentary, What a time that was. I guess most of the people who remember it are dead now. Glad he got to interview them first.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. And still relevant with parallels in the world today. Interesting reading ‘Grapes of Wrath’ with the knowledge of migrants in America and Europe today and the similar hardships they face.

      Like

  7. I loved this. Despair with a touch a hope.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Colline, where would we be without that hint of hope?

      Like

  8. All is not lost, hopefully. I’m yet to plug up the courage to dive into the Grapes of Wrath – perhaps I should!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s heavy going and quite long, but well worth it!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Your story goes so well with the picture. My mind went there as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Made me think of my grandmother, who lived in a dugout in the Utah desert for a number of years. Hard life, but she was a survivor.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We forget sometimes how fortunate we have it these days.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. So should I buy Justified and hold it until after I read Denial? I like your FF.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Justified is book one so read it first, then Denial to follow 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. okay, you can tell my reading skills are skewed, I decided it was the other way around. Good to know. Come Friday i will take the 99 cent plunge!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Excellent, for 99 cents hopefully you will find it well worth it! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Based on your writing I read in the last A to Z I have no doubt it will be worth more than that. Perhaps I can do a review on my Joe’s Musing site to help generate some interest.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Thanks Joe, I always welcome any reviews or comments, every little helps to spread the word.

        Like

  12. Already from the first sentence I felt the Grapes of Wraith… I remember reading it many years ago when I lived in southern California, and i remember how if actually saw the migrant workers who had slept in their cars while I was on my way to work.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Bjorn – unfortunately still relevant today, no lessons have been learned.

      Like

  13. Glad you let us in on your reading of The Grapes of Wrath. Lovely tie in with the prompt.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. What a great take, Iain. I love when what we are reading or listening to inspires us to write a great story.
    Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much Dale 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I was thinking “Grapes Of Wrath” as I was reading. You definitely captured that tone.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Nice one. I’ve always loved Steinbeck but it seems it’s time for a re-read of an old classic.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Always a treat to go back and re-read an old favourite 🙂

      Like

  17. I thoroughly enjoyed the way this devloped as I was reading.
    Sadly, I was left with longing for more. Nicely done, Iain.
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Always good to leave the reader wanting more 🙂 Thank you

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Sounds like a harsh life, but their family will endure.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very much the theme of the novel. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. One of the great books, it left me bereft when I first read it.
    You capture the mood well here.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you CE, a good compliment. Definitely one of the greats.

      Like

  20. Perhaps history will repeat itself in a different form of climate change. I see a warning in your story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are definite parallels in our ignorance of what climate and nature could unleash. Thanks James.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Wonderful writing with a great atmosphere, Iain. I think Graps of Wrath was the first Steinbeck book I read. Everything he wrote was good. Heartbreaking to see how many things still didn’t get better. Everywhere.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Grapes… G.R.A.P.E.S. — Sheesh.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I would love to read Graps of Wrath 😉 I imagine Steinbeck would find it hard to believe the world today still makes people suffer in the same way as he wrote about.

      Like

  22. I think they’ll make it. I might have to read that book now!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well worth a read Liz, definitely!

      Like

  23. A nice story. I am sure they will be successful in building the link. Life on the planet will survive, though at times it may appear that the end is near.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It certainly seems to feel that way at the moment. Lets hope your optimism is well-placed. Thank you for reading.

      Like

  24. Beautifully written, Iain. There’s this mingling of failure and despair with a lighter optimism. Was this set during the dust storms which moved across the Midwest during the 1930s? I saw a documentary about them. Such hard times and hard to keep your spirits up. However, a baby represents hope, new beginnings even though they also bring hard work.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Rowena, yes ‘The Grapes of Wrath’ was written about that era, just after the Great Depression and the impact it had on those families who lost their livelihood and homes.

      Like

  25. Family support chain. Great idea Iain. Great descriptions of the dust and dryness outside, somber mood

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Laurie 🙂

      Like

  26. this reminds me of the dust bowl in the 30s that occurred due to drought and poor farming practices that made the land totally useless. steinbeck’s grapes of wrath was based on it. nice take on the prompt.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yep, exactly where the inspiration came from.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. A fascinating take, which gave me lots to think about. Well done

    Liked by 1 person

  28. The Dust bowl turned people of promise either better or worse for their experience. So many people were changed forever. Nice story!

    Liked by 1 person

  29. A good story, Iain. I read “The Grapes of Wrath” many years ago and also saw the old movie starring Henry Fonda. Your story brought back the dust bowl years. Well done. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Suzanne, the film is a classic, and the book is something beyond that 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Grapes of Wrath was one of my favorites from school. (I should re-read it!)
    I did read recently: The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl.
    Such an amazing time and people. Your flash captures that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Dawn, and for the recommendation.

      Liked by 1 person

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