SURVIVING THE APOCALYPSE

On the wall hung the cracked television they couldn’t watch because there was no electricity.

The kitchen had an old cooker and refrigerator but without power they were merely  metal cupboards.

And now this.

‘What do you think? Our new bathroom suite.’

‘Where did you get them from?’

‘Found them. Minor defects but perfectly intact. No more hovering over a hole in the ground for us.’

‘We’ll still have to shovel the crap out and there’s no water.’

He looked at their dilapidated cottage with it’s crumbling walls and rickety doors.

‘One step at a time, darling, soon be back to normal.’


russells-bw
Copyright What’s His Name

Written as part of the Friday Fictioneers challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more details HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

89 responses to “SURVIVING THE APOCALYPSE”

  1. A story of Brexit Britain well told.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Haha, definitely one way to read it!

      Like

  2. This prompt is going to bring back lots of sh…y memories. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yep, a lot of cr*p stories this week!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Superbly describe. Made for a very depressing story but excellent writing, Kelly.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. How anyone can be that optimistic following the apocalypse is beyond me. Perhaps he’s putting on a brave face for his wife’s sake?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Think positive, that;s his motto and he’s sticking to it!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I think they’ll reconsider after a few days. The water comes first, not the seat!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Beggars can’t be choosers!

      Like

  6. With optimism like that, he’ll keep her going. Good story.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Dear Iain,

    You’ve captured the feeling. So bleak. Trying to recover what the locust has eaten. Nicely done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Rochelle, like most people, he just wants a quiet life.

      Like

  8. I think most people of third world countries already live like this.
    Beautiful writing, as always.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Interestingly those in the Third World will perhaps be able to adapt much better in this sort of crisis than the pampered First World inhabitants.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I would still say ‘Lucky them’.🙂🙂🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  9. The past and present for many, maybe the future for the rest of us. Well written.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I’ve become quite spoiled by indoor plumbing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think the developed world all have.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Good story, but I now can’t avoid the thought that Iain is the Scots version of John.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I prefer to think of John being the English version of Iain 🙂

      Like

  12. Where there is will there is a way, no? Still, I would prefer a functional toilet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Positive Mental Attitude – at least for now.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Very powerful! It highlights how much we rely on the conveniences (!) of modern life and how desperate we would be without them. An excellent story, very well told.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely Edith, we forget how much we owe to the humble toilet and sewage pipes!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Blind optimism I would say! Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. There is optimism and then there is blind optimism… then again, hope springs eternal and all that!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Got to cling on to some sort of hope, even if it’s just a broken loo!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. An unplumbed toilet has to be the least useful acquisition in the world. Still, baby steps and all that…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha, depends – at least it offers a comfortable seat…

      Like

  16. I knew people who lived like that for months while they built their own home, though I think they at least had a chemi loo! Grimly told Iain

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Urgh, chemi loos aren’t much better! Thanks Lynn.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Very true! My pleasure

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Thats about hope and taking one day at a time, nice one Ian

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I am writing a post-apocalyptic novel and, truly, one of the important things I had to think about for quite awhile was how a group of 12 was going to handle going to the toilet and what to do with the wastes. Good thing as a writer I have full control over it all.
    Scott
    Mine: https://kindredspirit23.wordpress.com/2017/11/29/friday-fictioneers-a-memory-a-fear-glad-i-am-older/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s such a vital part of creating a civilised world. Good luck with the novel.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Another good story. Enjoyed it 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I like him. He’s got his priorities right

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heading in the right direction. Thanks.

      Like

  21. In a situation like that you’re better off giving up with the old lifestyle and going for something just a little better than the new now.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Gradually it will get better I hope.

      Like

  22. You’ve given him great optimism, which should help them survive. Now he needs to realise that their waste matter is a resource. Composted for twelve months and they’ll have a clean, odour-free fertiliser!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Very true, good advice – I shall pass it on to him!

      Like

  23. Lovely, I felt the despair and the optimism at the same time.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. i love the positive attitude. well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. I actually see ‘high hopes’ in this piece. Good on him for trying to get things back to normal, one toilet at a time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There has to be hope, even if it’s slightly deluded! Thanks Alicia.

      Like

  26. Clever story! have to say, I can relate to a certain extent to the story. After a December ice storm, we were left without electricity, without water (we are on a well) and by default, without a working toilet. This lasted for 8 days. At least our walls were not crumbling.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That would make you appreciate the simple things in life! Thanks Susan.

      Like

  27. I am afraid his definition of “soon” is longer than what mine would be! LOL! But good for him in being optimistic !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha, yes, ‘soon’ is a relative term!

      Like

  28. This sounds a bit like Houston after Harvey.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I don’t dare imagine it. Thanks Susie.

      Like

  29. Like everything, time will heal these wounds too I’m sure. Brilliant take.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Reminds me of a house we looked at when it was for sale. The person that bought it got council to inspect it and they gave it the bathroom approval despite nothing being connected to anything. Council ended up having to pay for its connection to sewer. Great story. Thanks for the memory.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Irene – glad at least the council paid for it.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. Baby steps are major triumphs after the world has exploded.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Wow – you have a lot of followers. Cute story. People who like to rough it would fare better than the spoiled ones.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Nan – I know I wouldn’t last long 🙂

      Like

  33. Think camping with a solid roof and they’ll be fine!

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Sounds like they’re doing their best in a cr*p situation

    Like

  35. Ew. Really. I think I’d rather use a hole in the ground. Blech.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Very droll – think its about a relationship where she always hopes his promises will come true, and he knows they won’t !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Interesting perspective, thank you.

      Like

  37. Taking a dump is still one of life’s simplest pleasures. I like his attitude.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. You gotta love the optimism!

    Liked by 1 person

  39. I think I’d rather make use of a hole than shovel. Normal will take a while. Good writing, Iain. 😀 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  40. One step at a time… but I would go for a real outhouse without the porcelain… just keep digging.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Very nicely done again, Ian! Loved your take on the prompt…I would stick to the optimism here and hope for the best…after all ´Necessity is the mother of all invention´. Who knows what lies in store….Conquering the Apocalypse :):

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Tiny, lovely comment 🙂

      Like

  42. Sad to think of people living this way, but I love his attitude. I know they will make it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, he certainly seems to think so.

      Liked by 1 person

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