ARTISTIC IMPROVISATION

The curator scratched her head, while the museum porters waited for her decision.

‘Well, remove it of leave it?’ the surly head porter demanded.

They looked at the knotted tree branches atop the wicker chairs. She honestly couldn’t remember if it had been there before or not.

The Museum of Rural Life in Lumberton, North Carolina, had been abandoned to its fate when the storm came. Only now, after the flood waters had receded, were they allowed to return.

Much of the damage was superficial. The bigger permanent exhibits – the tractor room, the combine harvesters – needed layers of mud removed but little else.

She cursed the Modern Art Exhibition. ‘Life in Simpler Times’ was a collection of sculptures based on rural life in the early-20th century. Old bits of furniture in unusual positions, mixed with bits of trees at odd angles to make abstract compositions.

And now she was tasked with putting it back together. She had no idea what was storm debris and what belonged to the exhibit.

Then she had a brainwave. ‘Leave it all exactly as it is,’ she instructed.

Within a week the museum reopened with its new exhibition: ‘Storm Florence – A Memorial.’

Crowds gathered.


spf-09-23-18-fandango-2
Copyright Fandango

Written as part of Sunday Photo Fiction. Write a story of around 200 words based on the photo prompt given (above). Hosted by Susan Spaulding. For more details visit HERE.

To read more of the stories based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

35 responses to “ARTISTIC IMPROVISATION”

  1. Awesome response to the prompt!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Ramya

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Great take on the prompt Iain. The picture made me think of a stoey about pretentious art, but you’ve done it so much better than I could have. Incorporating the storm was a stroke of genius! The curator is a smart and creative woman – I wonder where she got that from?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, a very kind comment 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Wonderful take on the prompt. That curator sure figured out how to make hay out of a storm.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You have to make the best of a bad situation.

      Like

  4. Hi Iain. I’ve nominated you for the Sunshine Blogger award.
    https://pensitivity101.wordpress.com/2018/10/21/the-sunshine-blogger-award/
    I love your takes on prompts.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Di, I’ll look into it!

      Like

      1. You’re welcome. Enjoy.

        Like

  5. That is so amazing. Finding beauty in the wake of destruction. It’s lovely Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. michael1148humphris Avatar
    michael1148humphris

    That’s the way to do it. True modern art. It’s a fine piece of flash

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Great idea curator! Many damaged goods can be tagged as collectors items and sold for a premium.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There’s money to be made!

      Like

  8. Emin or Rodin? Fortunately, the curator is moving with the times

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So long as it brings in the crowds, does it matter?

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Some people will believe anything is art.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. We both saw ‘art’ in the photo. Yours was very timely and enjoyable. Nicely done, as always.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Susan, very kind.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. So that’s how some ‘great art’ ends up as museum showpieces. Good story, Kelly.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. “Museum of Rural Life in Lumberton, North Carolina”
    If it isn’t a real place, it should be–great name!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Lumberton is real, the museum is real, but the two don’t exist together – yet!

      Like

  13. Great take on the prompt, Iain. The curator made a good call.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. That was truly a brilliant thought she (and you) had!

    Liked by 1 person

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