MINOR CONCERTO

He scanned the musical notes on the page, hearing the flowing melody in his mind, the various sections of the orchestra taking the lead as his concerto ebbed and flowed, rose and fell, insisted and reserved.

Reaching the thunderous crescendo, he took the standing ovation.

He glanced at the clock. Five minutes until the client would be calling to hear their first demo.

He tucked away his undiscovered masterpiece and picked up the guitar.

He strummed out the catchy jingle for ‘Doggies Snack’ems: Sweetie Treaties,’ corrected a couple of notes, and waited for the irritating executive to call.


music-room
Copyright Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Written as part of the Friday Fictioneers challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more details HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

97 responses to “MINOR CONCERTO”

  1. How one suffers for one’s art. Nice one.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Apparently you have to! Thanks Sandra

      Like

  2. Aye, life in a nutshell!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m sure his day will come when what he dreamed of will come true. Thoughts become things 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Here’s hoping, I admire your optimism! 🙂

      Like

  4. Really enjoyed reading this, Iain. I wasn’t expecting that twist and I hope his masterpiece is recognised one day!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Susan – we can all dream while making a living!

      Like

  5. Dear Iain,

    I guess everyone has to start somewhere. Good one.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    PS This sentence, “He and glanced at the clock.” I don’t think you need ‘and.’ 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the spot Rochelle 😉

      Like

  6. There’s art and there’s making a living.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The trick is finding a way to combine the two.

      Like

  7. I hope his masterpiece does get discovered! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Genius undiscovered. One day, he’ll reach his dream.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A lucky few do get there in the end!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Ah, how real is that for most struggling musicians – his magnum opus lies disregarded and he has to debase himself writing jingles. Well written Iain

    Liked by 1 person

  10. It did make me smile but how real that is for many of us struggling with a day job, waiting for a break.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes musicians, writers and artists alike can all sympathise.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. His day job pays the bills and his true passion will be exposed for all to hear when he is good and ready…
    I like being optimistic.
    Very well done, Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. He admires your optimism 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I like the mystery you weaved into this musician’s secret project. I wish I could ask him for a listen. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. One day the world will hear it! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  13. You have to work for your living… hope he one day can live from the masterpiece

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Most of us are never that fortunate. Thanks Bjorn

      Like

  14. Standing ovations are all very well but they don’t pay the bills. Made me smile 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Most executives are irritating.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Oh, I very much like the way the opening of your story leads us to believe this is his big moment. Then, boom, doggie treat jingle. Thanks for the suprise.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Jingles can be awfully catchy. It takes a certain level of ability to make a good one, kinda like crafting flash fiction?

    Like

  18. If only there where more ways to allow more musicians the opportunity to inspire. I love hearing good street musicians, much as I enjoy seeing how we all interrupt the picture prompts

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Good rehearsal.
    Am sure the client will be impressed! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  20. His day will come – meanwhile, a chap’s got to eat!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Artists sometimes have to sell our souls to create our art. A sad, but true tale. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So many do. Thanks Jan

      Like

  22. Such a sadly common story, the artist who stoops to doing crap work to pay the bills while working on their true masterpieces. But this feels hopeful to me, because he really is writing his true love work in his spare time, and not just pining and wishing he were while his days slip away.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, he still has the passion and the belief, and hopefully it will one day pay off!

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Wondering how many got bogged down in the struggle to survive and lost their passion. Wonderful take.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hopefully he perseveres. Thank you

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Maybe not that concerto, maybe not the opera, maybe not the six string quartets that he composed feeling sure he could persuade some friends to perform them…
    Experts reckon it takes at least 10,000 hours to fully master the craft; that’s an awful lot to find in your spare time, but not impossible. He needs to persevere, then start networking like crazy. Are any of his irritating employers patrons of the arts, I wonder?
    BTW boring technical detail, a crescendo is not a point that you reach, it is the process of getting louder over a musical phrase.
    I enjoyed your story, Iain. I felt your main character accepted his fate with a degree of good humour that was rather endearing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Penny – interesting point about a crescendo. It appears you can reach a crescendo in popular speech, but in as a technical music phrase, you can’t! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  25. I’ve written some damn good songs that never got to tickle a recording executives ear, but then my writing hasn’t made it too far either. Oh well, we keep doing what we love and hope that someday it will find acceptance. How many artist didn’t become recognized until after they were dead?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m assuming my writing will be discovered and considered masterful once I’m dead. I guess that’s what all those agents are planning….

      Like

  26. So many classical pieces were discovered after their composers had passed on. We can only hope his talent and passion is recognised before too long.

    Click to read my FriFic tale

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Well, that’s one way to put doggie treats in the food bowl.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Got to pay the bills somehow 🙂

      Like

  28. A sad truth but there was a sweetness here. He’s still passionate about his own music, still pursuing his dreams. Writing jingles is just a pitstop. There’s still hope!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There’s always hope, thanks for reading 🙂

      Like

  29. Oh fabulous. Well told. The dream vs reality

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We’ve all been there

      Like

  30. Hey, at least he’s earning a living via his passion in one way or another! Great story. I loved the contrast between the beautiful, lyrical description of his music in the beginning and the plain ridiculousness of “Doggies Snack’ems: Sweetie Treaties” at the end – it really sums up the the double life the musician must feel like he’s living.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ellie, glad the contrast worked for you. Perhaps one day he can look back and remember it as a funny story on his way to fame and fortune!

      Liked by 1 person

  31. sadly, you’ve got to do what you’ve got to do.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We can’t all be Beethoven or Bach.

      Liked by 1 person

  32. Hey…even the greatest of talents have bills to pay!

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Love it. Very reality-like and fun.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Lisa 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  34. Art is great, but you’ve got to pay the bills!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Exactly Russell! Thanks for reading.

      Liked by 1 person

  35. Ah! A struggling artist. I hope he is one of those who really get to live their dream.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It happens for some!

      Like

  36. I hope this dreamer realises his dreams. The jingles must be soul-destroying, but will get him to where he wants to be, eventually.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. They keep a roof over his head and food on the table. His time will come hopefully 🙂

      Like

  37. He’s had to sell his soul to make a living but there’s hope, the future looks bright. Nicely told

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Like so many he just needs that lucky break. Thanks Michael

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Very relatable Iain and well crafted!

    Liked by 1 person

  39. I really enjoyed how you started the story, as he imagined himself onstage and taking the standing ovation. Then, reality crashes in. You painted well a picture of real life and fantasy. But sometimes fantasy can become real life. Hopefully, he will have his day! =)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Fingers crossed – it’s got to happen to someone 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  40. and the greatest catchy tune ever was unleashed to the world making dog owners everywhere pause to think about the quality of food they gave their pets.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It did some good then! 🙂

      Like

  41. Doggie Snackems! Love it. At least it pays the bills so he can write his masterpiece.

    Liked by 1 person

  42. I wish his talent gets recognized soon and he gets to live his dreams 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Don’t we all wish this?! Thanks for reading 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Absolutely! We all wish this 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  43. The things we have to do to fill our bellies.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Food on the table is always necessary.

      Liked by 1 person

  44. ahhhh… the things we do for love – I mean the things we do to pay the bills –
    hope his jingle was great

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was a catchy classic 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  45. We can all relate to this story, sad but true.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Afraid so. Thanks for reading 🙂

      Like

  46. Like your story very much, a perfect ‘cameo’- you create a particular moment in time- love the unexpected ending – made me smile.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

  47. They say if you work at what you love you are never working but for most of us, including your protagonist, it’s not possible. Not yet anyway. You have told his story neatly, Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Maybe one day – for a few of us at least! Thanks Jilly

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: